Related to Rules & Procedures

The Oath: The Obama White House and The Supreme Court
by Jeffrey Toobin

A Washington Post Notable Work of Nonfiction

From the moment Chief Justice Roberts botched Barack Obama's oath of office, the relationship between the Court and the White House has been a fraught one. Grappling with issues as diverse as campaign finance, abortion, and the right to bear arms, the Roberts court has put itself squarely at the center of American political life. Jeffrey Toobin brilliantly portrays key personalities and cases and shows how the President was fatally slow to realize the importance of the judicial branch to his agenda. Combining incisive legal analysis with riveting insider details, The Oath is an essential guide to understanding the Supreme Court of our interesting times.

Juvenile Justice: A Guide to Theory, Policy, and Practice
by Steven M. Cox

Brief, focused, and up-to-date, this must-have text by Stephen Cox, Jennifer Allen, and Robert Hanser takes students on a journey through the juvenile justice system by covering topics such as the history of the juvenile justice system, crime measurements, theories of crime causation, the juvenile justice process, community-based sanctions, treatment and rehabilitation, gangs, and international youth crime. Featuring new examples and new illustrations, Juvenile Justice: A Guide to Theory, Policy, and Practice, Eighth Edition helps readers develop a comprehensive understanding of the interrelationships among theory, policy, and the practical world of juvenile justice today.

The Little Book of Circle Processes : A New/Old Approach to Peacemaking (The Little Books of Justice and Peacebuilding Series)
by Kay Franis

     
     Drawn from Native American practices, these peacemaking circles are used in many communities to deal with conflict and create stronger relationships. Includes detailed information about how to lead and/or participate in one of the circle process.     
     Our ancestors gathered around a fire in a circle, families gather around their kitchen tables in circles, and now we are gathering in circles as communities to solve problems. The practice draws on the ancient Native American tradition of a talking piece. 
     
     Peacemaking Circles are used in neighborhoods to provide support for those harmed by crime and to decide sentences for those who commit crime, in schools to create positive classroom climates and resolve behavior problems, in the workplace to deal with conflict, and in social services to develop more organic support systems for people struggling to get their lives together. 
     
     A title in The Little Books of Justice and Peacebuilding Series.