Related to Earth Sciences

Pamphlet Architecture 33: Islands and Atolls
by Luis Callejas

o The competition for Pamphlet Architecture 33 asked previous authors in the series to nominate the architects and theorists whose work represents the most exciting design and research in the field today. The first of two winning entries (the other will be published in fall 2013 as PA 34) was submitted by Luis Callejas of LCLA Office in Medellin, Colombia. Pamphlet Architecture 33: Islands and Atolls asks how architecture might critically repurpose its traditionally limited disciplinary tools in order to make a meaningful impact at a territorial scale. Functioning as a landscape architect in a country that has no infrastructure for such a profession, Callejas questions pedagogical, disciplinary, and political norms at macro levels using micro tactics. As a result, PA 33 provocatively expands devices such as repetition and aggregation beyond their limits in scenarios where sociopolitical constraints seemingly prohibit what would normally be understood as an architectural intervention.

Natural Disasters
by Patrick Leon Abbott

Natural Disasters, 8th edition, is marked by major changes in organization and expanded coverage of weather and climate. The discussion of natural disasters is based on 4 main energy flows: 1) Earth's internal energy flow underlies earthquakes and volcanoes, 2) the external energy flow from the Sun fuels weather and climate including tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, wildfires, 3) gravity acts to pull down mass movements of earth and snow, and 4) impacts with asteroids and comets can have major effects on life. The book focuses on the Earth's natural processes and the disasters that occur when the Earth concentrates its energy and releases it to causing death and destruction. Throughout the book, certain themes are maintained: energy sources underlying disasters
plate tectonics and climate change;
earth processes operating in rock, water, and atmosphere;
significance of geologic time;
complexities of multiple variables operating simultaneously;
detailed and readable case studies.

Ecology: Concepts and Applications
by Manuel Molles

Ecology: Concepts and Applications by Molles places great emphasis on helping students grasp the main concepts of ecology while keeping the presentation more applied than theoretical. An evolutionary perspective forms the foundation of the entire discussion. The book begins with the natural history of the planet, considers portions of the whole in the middle chapters, and ends with another perspective of the entire planet in the concluding chapter. Its unique organization of focusing only on several key concepts in each chapter sets it apart from other ecology texts. Users who purchase Connect Plus receive access to the full online ebook version of the textbook.

The Cloudspotter's Guide: The Science, History, and Culture of Clouds
by Gavin Pretor-Pinney

Now in paperback: the runaway British bestseller that has cloudspotters everywhere looking up.

Where do clouds come from? Why do they look the way they do? And why have they captured the imagination of timeless artists, Romantic poets, and every kid who's ever held a crayon? Veteran journalist and lifelong sky watcher Gavin Pretor-Pinney reveals everything there is to know about clouds, from history and science to art and pop culture. Cumulus, nimbostratus, and the dramatic and surfable Morning Glory cloud are just a few of the varieties explored in this smart, witty, and eclectic tour through the skies.

Illustrated with striking photographs (including a new section in full-color) and line drawings featuring everything from classical paintings to lava lamps, The Cloudspotter's Guide will have enthusiasts, weather watchers, and the just plain curious floating on cloud nine.

The Weather Identification Handbook: The Ultimate Guide for Weather Watchers
by Storm Dunlop

What does it mean when there is a corona around the moon? How do you tell the difference between stratocumulus and nimbostratus clouds? THE WEATHER IDENTIFICATION HANDBOOK is an essential guide to the many different types of phenomena that may be observed, and also gives brief details of the weather that may be expected. The following topics are covered in a reader-friendly format:

Ø Cloud classification
Ø How to identify different cloud types and how they relate to forthcoming weather
Ø How clouds are formed
Ø Optical phenomena
Ø Precipitation
Ø Wind
Ø Severe weather
Ø Weather systems
Ø Satellite images and weather maps

Full of beautiful color photographs and diagrams, THE WEATHER IDENTIFICATION HANDBOOK is essential for the outdoor photographer, adventurer, or meteorological enthusiast. It is also perfect for any parent whose child asks the proverbial question, "Why is the sky blue?"

The Children's Blizzard
by David Laskin

Thousands of impoverished Northern European immigrants were promised that the prairie offered "land, freedom, and hope." The disastrous blizzard of 1888 revealed that their free homestead was not a paradise but a hard, unforgiving place governed by natural forces they neither understood nor controlled, and America’s heartland would never be the same.This P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor
by Hali Felt

“Deftly balances the scientific and poetic.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune
“Soundings is an eloquent testament both to Tharp’s importance and to Felt’s powers of imagination.”—The New York Times Book Review
Before Marie Tharp’s groundbreaking work in the 1950s, the ocean floor was a mystery—then, as now, we knew less about the bottom of the sea than we did about outer space. In a time when women were held back by the casually sexist atmosphere of mid-twentieth-century academia—a time when trained geologists and scientists like Tharp were routinely relegated to the role of secretary or assistant—Tharp’s work would completely change the world’s understanding of our planet’s evolution. By transforming dry data into beautifully detailed maps that laid the groundwork for proving the then controversial theory of continental drift, Tharp, along with her lifelong partner in science, Bruce Heezen, upended scientific consensus and ushered in a new era in geology and oceanography. "A playful, wildly thoughtful writer" (Oprah.com), Hali Felt vividly captures the romance of scientific discovery and brings to life this "strong-willed woman living according to her own rules, defying the constraints of her time" (The Washington Post).

Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor
by Hali Felt

Her maps of the ocean floor have been called "one of the most remarkable achievements in modern cartography", yet no one knows her name.
 
Soundings is the story of the enigmatic, unknown woman behind one of the greatest achievements of the 20th century. Before Marie Tharp, geologist and gifted draftsperson, the whole world, including most of the scientific community, thought the ocean floor was a vast expanse of nothingness. In 1948, at age 28, Marie walked into the newly formed geophysical lab at Columbia University and practically demanded a job. The scientists at the lab were all male; the women who worked there were relegated to secretary or assistant. Through sheer willpower and obstinacy, Marie was given the job of interpreting the soundings (records of sonar pings measuring the ocean's depths) brought back from the ocean-going expeditions of her male colleagues. The marriage of artistry and science behind her analysis of this dry data gave birth to a major work: the first comprehensive map of the ocean floor, which laid the groundwork for proving the then-controversial theory of continental drift.
When combined, Marie's scientific knowledge, her eye for detail and her skill as an artist revealed not a vast empty plane, but an entire world of mountains and volcanoes, ridges and rifts, and a gateway to the past that allowed scientists the means to imagine how the continents and the oceans had been created over time.
Just as Marie dedicated more than twenty years of her professional life to what became the Lamont Geological Observatory, engaged in the task of mapping every ocean on Earth, she dedicated her personal life to her great friendship with her co-worker, Bruce Heezen. Partners in work and in many ways, partners in life, Marie and Bruce were devoted to one another as they rose to greater and greater prominence in the scientific community, only to be envied and finally dismissed by their beloved institute. They went on together, refining and perfecting their work and contributing not only to humanity’s vision of the ocean floor, but to the way subsequent generations would view the Earth as a whole.
With an imagination as intuitive as Marie's, brilliant young writer Hali Felt brings to vivid life the story of the pioneering scientist whose work became the basis for the work of others scientists for generations to come.

Key Concepts in Geomorphology
by Paul R. Bierman

This book offers an integrative, applications-centred approach to the study of the Earth's dynamic surface. The authors draw from the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, and mathematics to help students get a basic understanding of Earth surface processes and the evolution of topography over short and long timescales.

What's Wrong with Climate Politics and How to Fix It (PWWS - Polity Whats Wrong series)
by Paul G. Harris

Governments have failed to stem global emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases causing climate change. Indeed, climate-changing pollution is increasing globally, and will do so for decades to come without far more aggressive action. What explains this failure to effectively tackle one of the world's most serious problems? And what can we do about it?

To answer these questions, Paul G. Harris looks at climate politics as a doctor might look at a very sick patient. He performs urgent diagnoses and prescribes vital treatments to revive our ailing planet before it's too late.

The book begins by diagnosing what’s most wrong with climate politics, including the anachronistic international system, which encourages nations to fight for their narrowly perceived interests and makes major cuts in greenhouse pollution extraordinarily difficult; the deadlock between the United States and China, which together produce over one-third of global greenhouse gas pollution but do little more than demand that the other act first; and affluent lifestyles and overconsumption, which are spreading rapidly from industrialized nations to the developing world.

The book then prescribes several "remedies" for the failed politics of climate change, including a new kind of climate diplomacy with people at its center, national policies that put the common but differentiated responsibilities of individuals alongside those of nations, and a campaign for simultaneously enhancing human wellbeing and environmental sustainability. While these treatments are aspirational, they are not intended to be utopian. As Harris shows, they are genuine, workable solutions to what ails the politics of climate change today.