Related to Criminal Law

Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain
by David Eagleman

If the conscious mind—the part you consider to be you—is just the tip of the iceberg, what is the rest doing?
 
In this sparkling and provocative new book, the renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman navigates the depths of the subconscious brain to illuminate surprising mysteries: Why can your foot move halfway to the brake pedal before you become consciously aware of danger ahead? Why do you hear your name being mentioned in a conversation that you didn’t think you were listening to? What do Ulysses and the credit crunch have in common? Why did Thomas Edison electrocute an elephant in 1916? Why are people whose names begin with J more likely to marry other people whose names begin with J? Why is it so difficult to keep a secret? And how is it possible to get angry at yourself—who, exactly, is mad at whom?
 
Taking in brain damage, plane spotting, dating, drugs, beauty, infidelity, synesthesia, criminal law, artificial intelligence, and visual illusions, Incognito is a thrilling subsurface exploration of the mind and all its contradictions.

Criminology: The Core, 4th Edition
by Larry J. Siegel

Concise, current, and affordable, best-selling CRIMINOLOGY: THE CORE, Fourth Edition delivers cutting-edge coverage in a succinct, student-friendly paperback. Author Larry Siegel guides readers through the fast-paced field of criminology, its most current research, and fascinating examples that help students truly understand criminological theory. The text effectively uses real-world material to clarify criminology's concepts and theories. Highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of criminology, it also offers unbiased coverage of even the most controversial issues--enabling readers to form their own opinions.

Federal Rules of Evidence, 2013-2014 with Evidence Map
by Daniel J. Capra

This pamphlet, which supports any classroom text, consists of the updated Federal Rules of Evidence and materials designed to aid in understanding, construing, and applying them. The Federal Rules of Evidence have been completely restyled, effective December 1, 2011, and the pamphlet provides a side-by-side comparison of before-and-after restyling of each Evidence Rule. It also contains relevant legislative history and Committee Notes, as well as the California Rules of Evidence. This edition of the pamphlet was prepared by Professor Daniel J. Capra, the Reporter to the Judicial Conference Advisory Committee on Evidence Rules. Professor Capra has included his own comments on many of the Restyled Rules--based on his role as Reporter to the Restyling Project--and also includes his article on case law that diverges from the text of the Evidence Rules.